Comments on Best value for high-end gas range with 5 burners" (8 total)  
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Re: Hi...
by ecadvocate
Hi, there's no need for me to remove this review. I think you and some others are referring to my discontinued model review which I had up in order to let people know my mistake and not buy the wrong model.

An OT rating and an explanation is more appropriate for that review than a NH and an explanation.
Jun 2, 2008
3:35 am PDT

Hi...
by Don_Krider
Your other review was "off topic" but you haven't deleted it. Since you now have two reviews with the same content (both from 2005), I have to rate this as NH:

http://www.epinions.com/content_211577376388

http://www.epinions.com/content_213614235268
Jun 1, 2008
10:43 am PDT

appropriate range hoods
by explorincookin
I just purchased the dual fuel model of this range. I need to replace my existing ventilation. Does anyone have suggestions/opinions on appropriate range hoods for this range. Thanks!
Oct 18, 2006
3:46 pm PDT

Re: Kenmore 79363 - assured about purchase but concerned...
by ecadvocate
Hi there. Sorry about the late response. I haven't been checking the comments in a while. Glad you liked the review.

The GE Profile, Kenmore Elite and Kitchen Aid are virtually
tied for their function and usability.

First off, from my understanding, ANY dual fuel model requires a 220 line. And sad to say, even Sears' wonderful website is wrong sometimes. But check with THE MANUFACTURER if you found an exception to that rule. The big benefit of dual fuel is electric baking (which doesn't dehydrate like gas ovens do) and gas cooking (faster and more precise than electric).

Dual fuel is the best choice IF...
-you don't mind spending $200 extra for the unit and a couple hundred extra for the 220 line.
-you do LOTS of baking and HATE the way gas bakes.

Dual fuel is NOT the best choice IF...
-you are super concerned about mechanical complexity (potentially more repairs)
-you are just a casual baker with no hatred towards gas.

All three brands use 3 elements - upper, lower and rear (surrounding the fan).
All three have convection not just for baking, but for broiling (check buttons to be sure).

KitchenAid advertises that you can broil with the oven door closed. This implies that other brands are supposed to have the door cocked open slightly while broiling for better air distribution (?) I have never broiled myself so I really don't know. That is why all ovens have that stop in the door for it to hang slightly open - its not just for cooling - it's also for broiling. (don't know why the others can't just "make" it work without that. This issue is not exactly advertised)

GE supposedly preheats faster than Kenmore Elite because it uses a temp sensor not a timer for preheating.
Kenmore Elite has more "features" many of which you might not use. (staged baking, etc)
All three offer convection broil as well as convection bake.
All three operate the same - shutting off the upper and lower elements and only using the rear element to maintain after the desired temp has been reached.

But here's where it might make a difference to you...
GE has a real 2nd oven in the bottom drawer.
Kenmore Elite only has a warming drawer.
Most KitchenAids usually have no drawer at all.

If you really don't mind stooping all the time, its a nice little oven on the GE. It goes up to 450 degrees.

Maytag/Amana/JennAir arrange their 2 ovens the opposite way - they have the 2nd smaller oven ABOVE the main oven which means more stooping for the big oven. But you get that fantastic no-stoop little oven on top for day to day heating up to 450 degrees! You can reheat or fully bake pizzas, pies or cakes. You kinda have to prioritize which oven you will use more - big or small. The big one is convection of course. The only downsides are the controls are cheaper, the plastic knobs are on the cooking surface and can be melted if you accidentally set a hot pot on them and the grates are not cast iron (when you order stainless steel) and it's a bit harder to clean. And there have been some reliability problems with Maytag - the parent company of those brands (Maytag/Amana/JennAir). But from what I hear, the ones with the dual ovens are actually pretty good. Do a bit of research first.

This is a toughie. I don't want to feel the wrath (kidding) if the Kenmore Elite for some reason disappoints.

My personal priority is ease of cleaning and operation which the Kenmore Elite excels at.

If my priority were pure bake/broil function and didn't need 5 burners or a 2nd oven or warming drawer or even a storage drawer but wanted to broil with the door closed I'd get the KitchenAid.

If my priority were fast preheating and a 2nd oven, I'd get the GE Profile.

If my priority was using a small oven all the time, didn't mind stooping to use the big oven, plastic knobs on the surface, cheap controls, etc, I'd get the Maytag/Amana/JennAir.

But the Kenmore Elite will do a good job of baking (and cooking on those 5 burners).
Jan 18, 2006
2:35 am PST

Kenmore 79363 - assured about purchase but concerned...
by sixdapples
This review makes me feel much better after ordering the Kenmore 79363, but maybe I can get some input as to if I'm getting the right range or not.
I expect full baking, roasting & broiling heat consistency in a convection oven.
I originally wanted a dual-fuel (true European most even full convection I've been told) over a full gas range.
I elected to stay with the full gas after I was told that I'd need a 240 electric line run for a dual fuel and that the FAN and 3rd element available in the Kenmore 79363 sufficient for my needs.
However, after purchasing, I re-reviewed specifications of similar GE & Kenmore gas AND dual fuel ranges and am quite concerned.
The specs on Sears website for the comparible models are confusing.
Kenmore seems to indicate which elements are convection; i.e., baking & broiling or baking only, while GE lists the convection specs differently; i.e., std & convection baking & broiling or all convection, etc.
Should I be concerned about the broiling on Kenmore, since it only indicates that the baking is convection? I would think I should get the most for my money and should get all convection.
And for the warming drawer VS the baking/warming drawer - I was disappointed to find out after my Kenmore purchase that GE does make a dual fuel with the 2nd oven that would not require a 240 line, but would connect to the 120 already in place.
I hope I make sense of my concern for full convection functions vs partial. Can broiling even be convection?
If the Kenmore's broiling is just as good as the GE, I can do without the extra oven in the GE and keep the Kenmore, but if the broiling is true convection in the GE, I may as well get the 2nd oven too! HELP!!! if you can...
Any input is appreciated!!! THANKS, Alice
Jan 8, 2006
2:39 pm PST

Kenmore 79363 - assured about purchase but concerned...
by sixdapples
This review makes me feel much better after ordering the Kenmore 79363, but maybe I can get some input as to if I'm getting the right range or not.
I expect full baking, roasting & broiling heat consistency in a convection oven.
I originally wanted a dual-fuel (true European most even full convection I've been told) over a full gas range.
I elected to stay with the full gas after I was told that I'd need a 240 electric line run for a dual fuel and that the FAN and 3rd element available in the Kenmore 79363 sufficient for my needs.
However, after purchasing, I re-reviewed specifications of similar GE & Kenmore gas AND dual fuel ranges and am quite concerned.
The specs on Sears website for the comparible models are confusing.
Kenmore seems to indicate which elements are convection; i.e., baking & broiling or baking only, while GE lists the convection specs differently; i.e., std & convection baking & broiling or all convection, etc.
Should I be concerned about the broiling on Kenmore, since it only indicates that the baking is convection? I would think I should get the most for my money and should get all convection.
And for the warming drawer VS the baking/warming drawer - I was disappointed to find out after my Kenmore purchase that GE does make a dual fuel with the 2nd oven that would not require a 240 line, but would connect to the 120 already in place.
I hope I make sense of my concern for full convection functions vs partial. Can broiling even be convection?
If the Kenmore's broiling is just as good as the GE, I can do without the extra oven in the GE and keep the Kenmore, but if the broiling is true convection in the GE, I may as well get the 2nd oven too! HELP!!! if you can...
Any input is appreciated!!! THANKS, Alice
Jan 8, 2006
2:15 pm PST

Re: Nice Job
by ecadvocate
Thank you. I am honored that you would take the time to say you enjoyed my writing. - Mike
Dec 11, 2005
1:57 am PST

Nice Job
by rfish, rfish is an Advisor on Epinions in Home and Garden
I enjoyed your article very much. Hope you have continued good luck with this one.

Thanks!
Ralph
Dec 10, 2005
7:50 pm PST